What’s a Hardship Permit?

Written by Reynolds Defense Firm

On February 24, 2019

What is a Hardship Permit?

A hardship permit allows you to operate a non-commercial motor vehicle, if your driver’s license is suspended after a DUI citation. A hardship permit gives you limited driving privileges for such things as going to and from work or your treatment classes.

When Can I Apply for a Hardship Permit?

There are waiting periods before you can apply for hardship permit. These time periods can range anywhere from 30 days to three years. Some circumstances allow you to apply right away, without having to wait. It’s always best to discuss this with your attorney so you know what options are applicable to your unique situation. It is important to note that all suspension and hardship permit rules are different for those who hold a Commercial Driver’s License (CDL).

How Do I Apply For A Hardship Permit?

You will need to complete the application, found here, complete with all of the necessary requirements. These requirements include proof of an SR-22 certificate and applicable fees among other things. To check the status of your application, and for other questions, you can contact the DMV suspension unit at 503-945-5000.

The DMV can take up to 2-6 weeks, on average, to process the Hardship Permit Application. It is a good idea to submit your application and supporting documents as early as possible. Early submission does not mean that the DMV will process your application early. This just ensures that the DMV has possession of your application and can begin processing it right away, once you are eligible.

 

You May Also Like…

Breath Test vs. Blood Test

Breath Test vs. Blood Test

If you are pulled over in Oregon and arrested for suspicion of DUII, you will likely be taken to a police station to test your blood alcohol content (BAC). And you’ve likely heard of a “breath test” and a “blood test” as methods for testing a person’s BAC, but what’s...

Are there legal consequences for refusing Field Sobriety Tests?

Are there legal consequences for refusing Field Sobriety Tests?

Drivers who are stopped by police on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants are typically asked to take field sobriety tests (“FST’s”). Most often these tests are carried out on the side of the road and the information that is gathered in these tests...

Can I get a DUI on my motorized bike?

Can I get a DUI on my motorized bike?

With the return of e-scooters, and the growing popularity of electric bikes in the city, we wanted to share a quick list of all the motorized bikes considered “vehicles” under the law.

0 Comments