An Oregon DUI and your out-of-state license

Written by Reynolds Defense Firm

On July 16, 2019

Came for the nature, left with a DUII.  Help!

From lush forests to craggy coastline, Oregon is bursting with attractions.  Whether you’re here for vacation or to visit a loved one, mistakes can happen at any time and any place.  Here at RDF, we have had the privilege of representing many people who live in other states, and even other times zones, who picked up a DUII while visiting Oregon.  You may not only be dealing with the criminal justice system itself for the first time – but a foreign system in a foreign state. Unlike many of our accessible hiking trails, that’s no walk in the park.

One of the most common questions we hear from out-of-state individuals is, “Will this DUII affect my license in my home state?” The question is often not so much, “Will it?” so much as, “How will it?”

Oregon has the authority to suspend your Oregon driving privileges.  What it does not have authority to do is suspend your driving privileges in another state – directly, at least.  Indirectly, what Oregon can do is notify your home state of your Oregon suspension, resulting in your home state instating its own suspension.  Now, it is possible that information falls through the cracks.  The flow of interstate information is like a garden hose – with potential kinks.  When it works as designed, the information should flow freely. It’s possible, though, the hose isn’t correctly hooked up.  It’s also possible that somebody forgets to turn on the water.

But you don’t want to find yourself counting on possibilities.  A DUII charge is a very serious traffic offense, and is viewed that way no matter which state you’re in.  You want to make sure you’re aware of all the potential outcomes, and the ways that you can plan and prepare.  Here is some helpful, general information regarding some of the methods that states may use to communicate regarding driver’s license suspensions:

Driver’s License Compact (DLC)

You’ve probably heard of the Driver’s License Compact. This is an agreement among 45 states to hold drivers to similar standards and report convictions to the licensing state. Only five states do not belong to this compact and they are Georgia, Massachusetts, Michigan, Tennessee and Wisconsin. A common misconception is that drivers coming from or moving to the non-member states will avoid facing consequences of a DUII conviction. However, member and non-member states may still share information.

National Driver Register (NDR)

All states use the NDR. It is a database of information about drivers who have had their licenses suspended or revoked, or who have been convicted of serious traffic violations. If you have been convicted of a DUII, that information is reported to the register. When you go to the DMV to apply for a license renewal or a license in a new state, the DMV will very likely check the NDR. This is another way your home state may find out about your Oregon DUII.

Driving suspensions are tricky, and when you pick up a DUII in Oregon, you’re likely facing both a criminal suspension as well as an administrative suspension.  Each comes with its own set of thorny challenges, and you want to make sure you are represented by a team that is equipped to help you untangle those.  Also keep in mind that driving privileges are just one component of the fallout from a DUII charge.  Issues such as transferring probation, coordinating out-of-state treatment, and out-of-state travel are all questions that we deal with on a daily basis.

If you’re facing a DUII charge in Oregon, call Reynolds Defense Firm today. Whether you were just visiting, have moved or are in the process of moving from Oregon, our team has the expertise to both handle your criminal case and explain how the charge could impact your life in another state. You can contact us for your free consultation by filling out the form on our website or by calling us at 503-223-3422.

You May Also Like…

Can I get a DUI on my motorized bike?

Can I get a DUI on my motorized bike?

With the return of e-scooters, and the growing popularity of electric bikes in the city, we wanted to share a quick list of all the motorized bikes considered “vehicles” under the law.

5 Reasons to Avoid Self-Representation

5 Reasons to Avoid Self-Representation

If you’re facing a DUI charge in Oregon you might be considering self-representation. Are you allowed to defend yourself in court? Yes. But the better question to ask is, should you? While there are many more legal resources available today than ever before, DUI...

DUI, DUII, DWI – What’s the difference?

DUI, DUII, DWI – What’s the difference?

In Oregon, if you are arrested for drinking and driving, you’ll be charged with “Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants,” or DUII for short. But you might have noticed that Oregon criminal defense attorneys commonly refer to themselves as DUI lawyers. And, you...

0 Comments