Oregon Court of Appeals Recognizes Selfies

Written by Reynolds Defense Firm

On November 12, 2018

Do you know the difference between a “duck face selfie” and a “beach feet brag selfie?”  The Oregon Court of Appeals does.  That very distinction featured prominently in a recent Oregon Court of Appeals decision in a criminal case involving very serious charges, in which the Court considered Merriam Webster’s definition of “selfie” before launching into an entertainingly lengthy discussion of the various types of “selfies,” including the “bathroom selfie,” the “bedroom selfie,” and the “I eat therefore I am selfie.”

It’s not uncommon for courts to consider details and evidence that, at first glance, would seem trivial to most people.  We also see this in the DUII world.  Although a DUII investigation may seem as if it’s limited to what law enforcement officers observe and document, we know from our experience with these cases that what happened leading up to that police encounter can in fact show something closer to the truth of what was really going on.  When the State charges someone with a crime, it often only sees the events from the officer’s perspective.  We get the opportunity to learn what happened directly from the individual involved.  And sometimes, the littlest detail can make a world of difference.  This could be an old receipt or bank statement, a bartender’s recollection, a medical record, or even a time stamp on a text message.

As technological capabilities are expanding, so are the means of recording evidence.  Video and audio evidence can prove to be some of the most powerful and compelling pieces in the complex puzzle of what happens in the courtroom.  Whether it is surveillance video from a nearby business or law enforcement video of the actual contact, that evidence can prove crucial to the case.  The first step is determining whether that video exists, and the next one is actually obtaining a copy – it’s a process that can prove exhausting but, ultimately, rewarding.  This is why it is crucial that you are represented by attorneys who can help determine not only what evidence is relevant to your case, but how to find that evidence and present it in the most effective way.

We at Reynolds Defense Firm not only strive to help our clients obtain the best outcome in their cases but, in doing so, shed light on the truth.

 

DUI attorney Oregon

 

Michelle Thomas is one of Reynolds Defense Firm’s talented DUI attorneys. She has a journalism background, a healthy love of craft foods and beverages, and an undeniable passion to help our clients navigate through the court system. As a former prosecutor who handled a heavy DUII case load, Michelle was eager to take her experience as a hard-working trial attorney and integrate it with our firm’s goals. To learn more about Michelle and how she helps our clients in the courtroom and beyond, please visit www.reynoldsdefensefirm.com.

 

 

 

Photo by Esmee Holdijk on Unsplash

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