Jurors Thoughts – A Rare Insight

Written by Reynolds Defense Firm

On January 2, 2018

Knowing what jurors say and do while they are deciding a case in the jury room is one of the great unknowns for trial lawyers. Our Reynolds Defense Firm attorneys can spend weeks preparing for each trial. Here’s the basic gist of what happens:

  • Our attorneys carefully craft our direct and cross examinations.
  • The team evaluates and refines our arguments.
  • We then write and rewrite our opening and closing.
  • We wait for the jury to come back with their verdict.

While it may not be obvious, all these steps take hours of preparation.  The hours of dedication to each of our clients ensures that everything plays out at trial as best as possible. Once the verdict is read, the jury usually leaves immediately, and we never hear from them again.  There is a reason for this, however.  From an ethical standpoint, we can’t contact jurors, even after a case is over. This means we rarely know what jurors actually think about a trial.

As it turns out, we got a favorable verdict.  After winning a jury trial (a case where the jury found our client Not Guilty of the DUI he was charged with), one of our attorneys received a pleasant surprise.

The Curveball

While the dust from the trial was settling, our attorney was excited to hear that the trial judge had some feedback from the jury to pass on.   The message? One juror’s feedback was pretty telling – he thought we did such a fantastic job for our client.  He was so impressed that he wanted RDF’s phone number to keep for himself, just in case.  While we are hardworking at RDF, we are humble enough to recognize the gravity of that juror’s feedback and strive to maintain a solid reputation with all members of the court.

If you or someone you believe in has been arrested for a DUI, please call us today. While facts differ and so do outcomes, our promise to do the absolute best we can for each person we represent is always exactly the same.

 

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